Jake's Journey with Apraxia

And the Friends We Met Along the Way

Reinforcing the words that Jake practices at speech therapy has always been important to me. I haven’t always met my goals or been successful with my attempts, but through trial and error, I have found out what makes Jake tick. He likes adventure, variety, and he likes to move. Most importantly, he doesn’t mind saying …

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When Jake was 30 months old and we started speech therapy with SLP #2, she suggested we read repetitive books. Jake did not have an apraxia diagnosis at that time and during speech therapy she would read him Brown Bear and they would do a craft. The entire time, she would encourage him to speak, …

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In Monday’s post I mentioned that Jake has not been showing me the love for those homemade Kaufman flash cards. For those of you that are regular readers, you know that I spent a LOT of time and effort making these cards perfect. Needless to say, when he’s squirming around in the chair next to …

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My husband works for a company that recruits speech therapists for public school systems across the country. One of his co-workers has a blog geared towards SLPs and employment, and in January of this year, I was a guest writer on her site. This particular post has been sitting in my computer for the past …

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This title came to me in about three seconds, probably because I’ve been living, breathing, and intensely photographing baseball all three days this past weekend. Our baseball season got extended into June this year because my middle son, who is eight, got selected to play on the all-star team. Also, my husband, who played baseball …

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When Neil Sedaka blended the notes perfectly together back in the 1960s to sing the song, Breaking Up Is Hard to Do, he didn’t know that one day someone might disagree with his heartfelt chorus. Anyone who has tried scripting with their apraxic child knows that breaking up a word or sentence into a simpler …

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When Jake first got diagnosed with apraxia and I was on a Google frenzy, I read, When a child has Childhood Apraxia of Speech he or she may need 3,000 productions of a sound combination or word to learn a muscle memory for that combination. Whoa! To say the least, that statistic upset and overwhelmed …

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